#weekendflow #OOTD #outfitoftheday #outfit #sunday (at Cafe Brasil)

yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.





Patterns influence art

yagazieemezi:

Njideka Akunyili was born in Enugu, Nigeria. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2011, a Post-Baccalaureate certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 2006, and her BA from Swarthmore College in 2004. She is one of the 2013 recipients of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation grant. Akunyili’s work has been exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; the American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY; the Museum of New Art, Detroit, MI; and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among others. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Yale University Art gallery, the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Rubell Family collection.

Patterns influence art


PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:
Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.
by 
Peter Krasilnikoff

PHOTOGRAPHY OF AFRICA:

Camps Bay 1st of January 2012, South Africa.

by 

Peter Krasilnikoff

(via cruelladetrillaa)

africanrelic:

cashmerethoughtsss:

shugavery:

jelliecakess:

lightspeedsound:

official-mens-frights-activist:

the-real-goddamazon:

sourcedumal:

siddharthasmama:

yes. I am here for this - downplay Europe like they downplay Asia and Africa. I refuse to recognize Europe as a true continental mass. #notsorry

Europe is Far West Asia and will now be referred to as such.

Western Asia.

there’s no geological/tectonic reason for europe to be a different continent from asia; white people just wanted to feel special so they pretended to be a different continent

i’m all for this

bahahahahahahahahahaha

In dead I’m dying I can’t breathe

I been saying this 

this is forreal omg

blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off
blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea’s new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.
For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.
Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.
Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 
Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.
Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”
Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”
Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.



everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off

blkmartian:

a-wanderlustsoul:

thechanelmuse:

Reagan stays speaking the truth. Below are excerpts from Vogue's “The Dawn of the Butt: Big Booty in Pop Culture Over the Years" article:

As we await the premiere of Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azaleas new music video, it would appear that the big booty has officially become ubiquitous.

For years it was exactly the opposite; a large butt was not something one aspired to, rather something one tried to tame in countless exercise classes. Even in fashion, that daring creative space where nothing is ever off limits, the booty has traditionally been shunned. Though nipples have long been a runway staple.

Perhaps we have Jennifer Lopez to thank (or blame?) for sparking the booty movement. When she first arrived on the scene in the late nineties, a lot of the buzz surrounding her focused on the back of her voluptuous body. Her derrière quite literally stood out against the other sex symbols of the moment, signaling a shift away from the waif era of Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Moss and the outrageously large-breasted Pam Anderson. Lopez’s behind was so unique, and evidently so valuable, there were rumors she had taken out insurance worth millions to protect the asset.

Around the same time, the look of pop music was set by Britney Spears’s over-toned abs. But the curvaceous bodies that made up Destiny’s Child had also started making waves on MTV in 2001 with “Bootylicious.” 

Enter Kim Kardashian. Kardashian and her family debuted their reality show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, in 2007. It made the entire clan famous, of course, but Kardashian’s behind was the real star, and was frequently employed as a plot device. In one season, Kardashian even X-rayed her body to prove her curves were real and not the by-product of artificial implants. Instagram also launched that other famous booty: the one on workout sensation Jen Selter. A civilian who just happens to do an obscene amount of squats, Selter is known for her belfies (just put two and two together) and every single one of her posts to her 4 million followers makes sure to include the bubble butt that launched her career front and center.

Then came the total bootification of pop music. At the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Miley Cyrus proved you didn’t need to have a large butt to become a part of the conversation, you just needed to know how to attract enough attention to one.Shakira and Rihanna had a booty-off in their video for “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Beyoncé surprised the world by dropping her Visual Album last December—and her good-girl image. The racy video for “Partition” has her in a bejeweled thong on a top of a piano, while “Rocket” begins with the lyrics: “Let me sit this ass on you.”

Recently, Nicki Minaj remixed the original butt song by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back,” into “Anaconda,” driving the point home with extreme twerking, blatant close-up shots of her booty, and cut-to-the-chase lyrics: “Fuck those skinny bitches in the club/I wanna see all the big fat ass bitches in the motherfucking club.”

Which brings us full circle to J. Lo—the original trailblazing butt girl—and the imminent video for “Booty.” It features the 45-year-old doused in what looks like Vaseline or honey, prompting listeners to “Throw up your hands if you love a big booty.” It’s safe to say that, this time around, the world is thoroughly ready for the jelly.

image

everybody wants to be a nigga…..

Reagan goes tf off

(via blackfashion)

“He who jumps into the void owes no explanation to those who stand and watch.”
Jean-Luc Godard  (via zvmkhl1992)

(via burdge)

“The Negro learns that one is not black without problems.”
— Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks (via palmares-politics)

But all we learned about in our schools is Freud, and his psychosexual issues

(via thekamerunian)

(via boojiek)

ejanefoto:

My mentor, Michael B Platt and his wife Carol Beane.

This photograph was the back page spread in today’s Washington Post! I’m the model in the prints behind him.

Article here: http://wapo.st/1ptvdJp   

(via newmodelminority)

blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
blasianxbri:

MESSAGEEEEEEEEE!!!!!

armaniblanco:

When girls are about to jump in the double dutch rope.

(via qtpiiie)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali
Hââbre, the last generation
1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”
2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”
3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”
4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”
5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “
6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 
7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”
Website

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali

Hââbre, the last generation

1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”

2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”

3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”

4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”

5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “

6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 

7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”

Website

(via yagazieemezi)

beautiesofafrique:

1) STOP asking me what your name is in African (African is not a language)

2) STOP asking me whether or not you can join my tribe (we don’t want you, if you aren’t apart of the African diaspora then you’re not welcome)

3) STOP asking me why I speak English so well

4) STOP making fun of my…

(via boojiek)

dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)
dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.
Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.
The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.
Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.
However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.
This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.
Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.
See an extended gallery.
(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

dynamicafrica:

Tunisian Island Becomes Street Art Hub, Raises Questions of Politics in Graffiti.

Whether cave paintings or hieroglyphics, Africans have been painting on walls for centuries. However, the idea of turning open streets into an open outdoor gallery and exhibit is something relatively new to North Africa’s largest island and Tunisia’s most popular tourist destination Djerba.

The initiative, curated by Tunisian-French artist Mehdi Ben Cheikh in collaboration with Paris-based art gallery Galerie Itinerance, is called Djerbahood features works from around 150 artists spanning 30 different countries, including Sweden’s ROA, Alexis Diaz from Puerto Rico, Stinkfish out of Colombia, Brazilian muralist Claudio Ethos, French artist Brusk, Moroccan calligraphist Abdellatif Moustad, and Tunisian street artists eL Seed and The Inkman.

Dealing with issues ranging from history and politics, to spirituality and tradition, Djerbahood, is a collaboration of epic proportions. Whether intentional or not (and I think not), the name calls to mind the racism that exists in the world of street art and graffiti culture that has, in recent years, both omitted and excluded the contributions made by black and brown artists in the popularization of this art form. Were in not for movies like Wild Style and Style Wars, the origins of resistance graffiti might all be forgotten from popular memory.

However, with the growing number of street artists and street art emerging from this area of the world in recent times, it would’ve been more interesting had they featured a selection of artists from around the African continent. Countries like South Africa and Senegal are home to some of the continent’s growing local street art scenes. Due to its size, it somewhat eclipses the grassroots graffiti movements across North Africa made headlines when #ArabSpring was a trending topic, and seemed to fade as quickly as it was noticed by the west. Then again, the politics behind this open art affair, due to unveil September 20th, aren’t rooted in Pan-African sentimentality, being sponsored by parties from France and Tunisia.

This project forms part of a growing trend of foreign street artists descending on Africa, from the likes of French artist JR’s “Women Are Heroes" series that stopped in Sierra Leone, Kenya, Sudan and Liberia, to ROA’s "Wide Open Walls" in The Gambia.

Similarly to the reactions from people in the aforementioned countries, locals in the area have had mixed responses to the art works, from some labeling it as vandalism to others welcoming the diversity and finding inspiration in the larger-than-life paintings.

See an extended gallery.

(image sources: Aline Deschamps/Galerie Itinerrance | Mohamed Messara | EPA Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

   
yarrahs-life:

thesoftghetto:

We’ve all heard of Betty Boop. But how many of you knew that she was based off of a BLACK woman.
Yes Betty Boop was based off of Ms.Esther Jones known by her stage name “Baby Esther”. She was an African-American singer and entertainer of the 1920’s. Her singing trademark was “Boop oop da doop” hence the name Betty Boop! She performed regularly at the cotton club in Harlem,New York.
Source

Wow
yarrahs-life:

thesoftghetto:

We’ve all heard of Betty Boop. But how many of you knew that she was based off of a BLACK woman.
Yes Betty Boop was based off of Ms.Esther Jones known by her stage name “Baby Esther”. She was an African-American singer and entertainer of the 1920’s. Her singing trademark was “Boop oop da doop” hence the name Betty Boop! She performed regularly at the cotton club in Harlem,New York.
Source

Wow

yarrahs-life:

thesoftghetto:

We’ve all heard of Betty Boop. But how many of you knew that she was based off of a BLACK woman.

Yes Betty Boop was based off of Ms.Esther Jones known by her stage name “Baby Esther”. She was an African-American singer and entertainer of the 1920’s. Her singing trademark was “Boop oop da doop” hence the name Betty Boop! She performed regularly at the cotton club in Harlem,New York.

Source

Wow

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)