“Black women have had to develop a larger vision of our society than perhaps any other group. They have had to understand white men, white women, and black men. And they have had to understand themselves. When black women win victories, it is a boost for virtually every segment of society.”

- Angela Davis, activist, author, educator

Happy 70th birthday to one of my favourite sheroes ever! 

(via night-catches-us)

(via eloronegro)

                   
12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.
12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.
12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.
12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.
12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

(via qtpiiie)

             
yagazieemezi:

I have always been attracted to the use of color with mixed prints and patterns so I was very pleased to come across the work of South African artist and illustrator, Marna Hattingh. As a children’s book illustrator, her vibrant characters are often caught in the act of play and fantasy while her intricately detailed backgrounds gives the viewer an eye-full to dive deeper into.
"Hattingh finds inspiration for her artworks, within her South African and wider society, particularly the complexity of our daily lives.  Drawing inspiration from an eclectic range including media, fashion, history and fictional novels, her finely drawn characters jump, dance and spin across timeless, patterned backgrounds. Each painting is extensive worked and contains its own complex narrative; an immediacy that is difficult to ignore.” (SOURCE)
View more of her work HERE.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

I have always been attracted to the use of color with mixed prints and patterns so I was very pleased to come across the work of South African artist and illustrator, Marna Hattingh. As a children’s book illustrator, her vibrant characters are often caught in the act of play and fantasy while her intricately detailed backgrounds gives the viewer an eye-full to dive deeper into.
"Hattingh finds inspiration for her artworks, within her South African and wider society, particularly the complexity of our daily lives.  Drawing inspiration from an eclectic range including media, fashion, history and fictional novels, her finely drawn characters jump, dance and spin across timeless, patterned backgrounds. Each painting is extensive worked and contains its own complex narrative; an immediacy that is difficult to ignore.” (SOURCE)
View more of her work HERE.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

I have always been attracted to the use of color with mixed prints and patterns so I was very pleased to come across the work of South African artist and illustrator, Marna Hattingh. As a children’s book illustrator, her vibrant characters are often caught in the act of play and fantasy while her intricately detailed backgrounds gives the viewer an eye-full to dive deeper into.
"Hattingh finds inspiration for her artworks, within her South African and wider society, particularly the complexity of our daily lives.  Drawing inspiration from an eclectic range including media, fashion, history and fictional novels, her finely drawn characters jump, dance and spin across timeless, patterned backgrounds. Each painting is extensive worked and contains its own complex narrative; an immediacy that is difficult to ignore.” (SOURCE)
View more of her work HERE.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

I have always been attracted to the use of color with mixed prints and patterns so I was very pleased to come across the work of South African artist and illustrator, Marna Hattingh. As a children’s book illustrator, her vibrant characters are often caught in the act of play and fantasy while her intricately detailed backgrounds gives the viewer an eye-full to dive deeper into.
"Hattingh finds inspiration for her artworks, within her South African and wider society, particularly the complexity of our daily lives.  Drawing inspiration from an eclectic range including media, fashion, history and fictional novels, her finely drawn characters jump, dance and spin across timeless, patterned backgrounds. Each painting is extensive worked and contains its own complex narrative; an immediacy that is difficult to ignore.” (SOURCE)
View more of her work HERE.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

I have always been attracted to the use of color with mixed prints and patterns so I was very pleased to come across the work of South African artist and illustrator, Marna Hattingh. As a children’s book illustrator, her vibrant characters are often caught in the act of play and fantasy while her intricately detailed backgrounds gives the viewer an eye-full to dive deeper into.

"Hattingh finds inspiration for her artworks, within her South African and wider society, particularly the complexity of our daily lives.  Drawing inspiration from an eclectic range including media, fashion, history and fictional novels, her finely drawn characters jump, dance and spin across timeless, patterned backgrounds. Each painting is extensive worked and contains its own complex narrative; an immediacy that is difficult to ignore.” (SOURCE)

View more of her work HERE.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

In history class…

onlyblackgirl:

"White people built america"

image

"Columbus is a hero"

image

"Manifest Destiny" 

image

"Survival of the fittest" 

image

"Slavery, segregation, some MLK & Rosa Parks happened, end of racism"

image

"The Melting Pot" 

image

"Land of the free/opportunity" 

image

(via qtpiiie)

thechanelmuse:

1000 roses on Canfield, the area which Mike Brown was murdered.
thechanelmuse:

1000 roses on Canfield, the area which Mike Brown was murdered.

thechanelmuse:

1000 roses on Canfield, the area which Mike Brown was murdered.

(via newmodelminority)

ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA
ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA
ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA
ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA
ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA
ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA
ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden
Artist StatementTamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.
info via ADA

ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden

Artist Statement
Tamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.

info via ADA

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)

dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
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dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.
As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war). 
But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history. 
It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale. 
From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world. 
World War I in Africa.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.

As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war).

But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history.

It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale.

From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world.

World War I in Africa.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

(via katebomz)

yagazieemezi:

Emmanual Afolabi: The Journey
New work by contributing photographer Emmanuel Afolabi for yagazieemezi.com
"I caught up with Eli Fola, Nigerian born saxophonist and lead singer of NYC’s based world music band known as Dahka Band,  a multi-cultural world band with members  from Algeria, Turkey, Ecuador, and The Philippines. Eli Fola was introduced to music at the age of 9, heavily influenced by the church his parents were a part of in Nigeria. It was there that he joined the choir and there he started learning to play different musical instruments like African drums, congas, piano, and eventually settling with the saxophone."
Keep reading + more pictures
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Emmanual Afolabi: The Journey
New work by contributing photographer Emmanuel Afolabi for yagazieemezi.com
"I caught up with Eli Fola, Nigerian born saxophonist and lead singer of NYC’s based world music band known as Dahka Band,  a multi-cultural world band with members  from Algeria, Turkey, Ecuador, and The Philippines. Eli Fola was introduced to music at the age of 9, heavily influenced by the church his parents were a part of in Nigeria. It was there that he joined the choir and there he started learning to play different musical instruments like African drums, congas, piano, and eventually settling with the saxophone."
Keep reading + more pictures
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Emmanual Afolabi: The Journey
New work by contributing photographer Emmanuel Afolabi for yagazieemezi.com
"I caught up with Eli Fola, Nigerian born saxophonist and lead singer of NYC’s based world music band known as Dahka Band,  a multi-cultural world band with members  from Algeria, Turkey, Ecuador, and The Philippines. Eli Fola was introduced to music at the age of 9, heavily influenced by the church his parents were a part of in Nigeria. It was there that he joined the choir and there he started learning to play different musical instruments like African drums, congas, piano, and eventually settling with the saxophone."
Keep reading + more pictures
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Emmanual Afolabi: The Journey
New work by contributing photographer Emmanuel Afolabi for yagazieemezi.com
"I caught up with Eli Fola, Nigerian born saxophonist and lead singer of NYC’s based world music band known as Dahka Band,  a multi-cultural world band with members  from Algeria, Turkey, Ecuador, and The Philippines. Eli Fola was introduced to music at the age of 9, heavily influenced by the church his parents were a part of in Nigeria. It was there that he joined the choir and there he started learning to play different musical instruments like African drums, congas, piano, and eventually settling with the saxophone."
Keep reading + more pictures
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

Emmanual Afolabi: The Journey

New work by contributing photographer Emmanuel Afolabi for yagazieemezi.com

"I caught up with Eli Fola, Nigerian born saxophonist and lead singer of NYC’s based world music band known as Dahka Band,  a multi-cultural world band with members  from Algeria, Turkey, Ecuador, and The Philippines. Eli Fola was introduced to music at the age of 9, heavily influenced by the church his parents were a part of in Nigeria. It was there that he joined the choir and there he started learning to play different musical instruments like African drums, congas, piano, and eventually settling with the saxophone."

Keep reading + more pictures

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

conelradstation:

Laurence Fishburne in Boyz N the Hood (dir. John Singleton, 1991)
conelradstation:

Laurence Fishburne in Boyz N the Hood (dir. John Singleton, 1991)
conelradstation:

Laurence Fishburne in Boyz N the Hood (dir. John Singleton, 1991)
conelradstation:

Laurence Fishburne in Boyz N the Hood (dir. John Singleton, 1991)

conelradstation:

Laurence Fishburne in Boyz N the Hood (dir. John Singleton, 1991)

(via gyenyame)

grijzegans:

MAD Magazine recreates Norman Rockwell’s famous 1958 painting ‘The Runaway’
grijzegans:

MAD Magazine recreates Norman Rockwell’s famous 1958 painting ‘The Runaway’

grijzegans:

MAD Magazine recreates Norman Rockwell’s famous 1958 painting ‘The Runaway’

(via dimepieceofafrica)

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